Blink-182

Musical Rant: My Distant Relationship with Blink-182

My relationship with Blink-182 has been strained ever since Matt Skiba took over for Tom DeLonge. Nothing against him; the guy actually gels really well with the band. But no matter how many times I listen to their newer stuff, I just can’t get into it.

The band isn’t the same to me. Though I didn’t hate California, I quickly grew tired of it and after my initial review, I haven’t listened to any of the songs since. I was baffled with the deluxe version boasting a second disc with what boils down to another album. With every preview and song they released, I slowly realized I didn’t care. But I was still mildly curious about the second disc and gave it a listen. I was surprised I liked it more than the original album, but it also drove home how much I don’t care about this band anymore.

When the band announced California Deluxe, I didn’t get it. Why reissue an album that’s not even a year old? And if they had so much material, why not release it on its own? It didn’t make sense to me. Whereas in the past, the thought of an expanded Blink album would be amazing, this time it felt pointless. Still, I was curious to see if the new music was worth it. And it’s not bad. None of the songs are outright terrible, but very few managed to grip me. “Misery” was okay, but felt like I was reading cringe-worthy teen poetry, “Good Old Days” has a strong hook and great energy, but is tiring due to the overused “let’s get nostalgic” theme. “Don’t Mean Anything” is repetitive and weak when compared to the rest of the songs and “Hey I’m Sorry” is forgettable, but has a good energy and vibe. And “Can’t Get You More Pregnant” is just dumb and pointless.

Still, most of the songs have more substance than those on California. Though most of them aren’t that interesting, they aren’t generic. They feel genuine, even the ones that sound like teen angst. Reading through the lyrics I didn’t roll my eyes nearly as much as I did with the previous LP. Even though I didn’t like most of the songs, I can stand to hear them, as long as they don’t deal with looking back (“Parking Lot”). It’s a trend Blink’s been on that I’m sick of. I get it, they’re older, they want to reflect, but we already got that with California. Let’s move on.

Luckily, there’s some promise to the album. “Wildfire” and “Bottom of the Ocean” are great songs – probably the best of the new Blink era. Some of these songs remind you of older Blink – lots of fun, great fast music, and a good hook. “6/8” is a standout song that’s heavy as hell. It almost sounds like a b-side from Untitled. Everything about it is awesome from the in your face aggression to the way Matt sounds like he’s screaming from miles away. The odd 6/8 structure really helps the song stand out and creates this cool, yet odd, flow.

So yeah, I like the second disc better than California. At the same time, I realize I don’t care what Blink does anymore. I couldn’t even find much to say about this release. Whereas before I would relish any news involving them and devour every single song they released, I didn’t give a shit this time. They kept posting songs from the Deluxe version and I ignored them. Their new stuff doesn’t hit that sweet spot. With Tom, they had a style all their own. Now, they sound like every other “pop-punk” band out there. Seeing their name doesn’t bring about that same sense of excitement. Rather, it’s more of a disappointment.

Though many disagree, I still think Tom is an essential part of the band. He had a certain sound and vibe that Blink is currently lacking. They just don’t sound the same. They’re different now and that’s okay. They are allowed to change and I’m happy the band is continuing to make music. It’s just not for me. I can’t exactly say if my missing Tom is what makes me dislike their new stuff; maybe it does. All I know is I don’t feel that same happiness and excitement when I hear them now. Maybe over time, this will change and I see these albums in a more favorable light. But I can’t pretend that I care about what’s going on with them now. They can still make exciting music as some of the songs show, but they’re still trying to find the right direction. I will always love Blink-182, but at this point, I’m moving on.

2016 Album that Left Me Conflicted

California – Blink-182

It’s been painful following the Blink-182 debacle. With Tom leaving the band, but not really leaving the band, according to him anyway, it seemed like it was the end. They tried reforming and it clearly didn’t work. Story over, right? Instead, they recruit Alkaline Trio’s Matt Skiba and drop a new album. And if you thought the Untitled album divided the fanbase, this record destroyed it. Go to any forum or comments section and thoughts range from “This is the best they’ve done in years” to “They’re fucking garbage now!” It feels impossible having a discussion about the album without having the Tom vs Matt argument.

My expectations were pretty low after I heard the first single, but I was still pretty happy to hear new music from them, especially since I didn’t think it was happening. Once I got the album, I could only stomach hearing the entire record about three times. I don’t hate it; there are actually some songs that impressed me. I love the big booming verse of “Los Angeles” and “Cynical” might be the best song on the album. Still, California is nowhere near their best. And don’t get me started about their Grammy nominee. Even though I knew I didn’t really care for the album, I still felt confused about the whole situation.

I’m in the Blink-isn’t-Blink-without-Tom camp. The instant rebuttal for this is how Blink faltered when he was in the band. Personally, I thought Neighborhoods was pretty good and the Dogs Eating Dogs EP made me think even better music was in store. Yes, I do think Tom is a dick for leading on fans when he really didn’t want to be in Blink anymore. But Tom brought a certain sound to Blink that’s missing on California. When I listen to that album, it doesn’t sound like I’m listening to Blink-182. It sounds like I’m listening to some other generic “pop-punk” band. Blink-182 have never been the best pop-punk band around, but they had a style and vibe that was all their own. I hear none of that on their latest album. It might as well be +44’s follow up and even that album is better than California. And it’s funny how many people think Matt is better when half the time it sounds like he’s doing an impression of Tom.

At the same time, I agree with people who say Blink have the right to move on if one member doesn’t want to play anymore. Yes, they certainly do, just like Tom has the right to do other projects. Still, it’s not the same to me. And that’s fine. It still feels weird to see pictures of them or hear their name and see Matt instead of Tom. I’m sure it’s one of those things I’ll get used to, but they might’ve been better off releasing the album under a different name. There are certain expectations that come with the Blink-182 name and for me, California didn’t hit them at all. Maybe things will get better for Blink once Matt’s been in the band for a while and the shock of not seeing Tom washes away. But it will never be the same for me and that’s something I can accept.

We Don’t Need to Whisper – Angels & Airwaves

Release Year: 2006

Rating: 7/10

Being a Blink-182 fan since Enema of the State, there’s no question I was heartbroken about the band’s 2005 breakup. But each member would continue making their own music. Me being the supportive fan cheered for Mark, Tom, and Travis even if they were doing things separately. Though I was a fan of +44, I never got into Angels & Airwaves. I loved the debut single, but after that, I grew disinterested. With the recent Blink-182 drama, it made me think back to the initial break up and when I actually listened to AvA. So I decided to give their debut album another shot to see if my opinion of the band changed.

When AvA first debuted, I never believed Tom’s claims about the band changing the face of rock music or starting a revolution. But I still gave it a chance since he was my favorite Blink member. I never really got into the entire album, but I loved the first single “The Adventure.” It’s a song I haven’t listened to in recent years, but revisiting it I discovered I still actually like it. It’s catchy, upbeat, and has a cool spacey guitar riff reminiscent of The Cure. The mechanical noises in the background even sound like early Depeche Mode. It also has a positive message about no matter how much pain you’re in everything will be fine in the end. It’s one of the strongest songs on the album and the most interesting.

Another surprisingly strong track is “The War.” What makes this song so refreshing is the energy behind it. As soon as the track opens with thudding percussion and somewhat corny handclaps it grabs your attention, something most of the other songs fail to do. The music, which features DeLonge’s classic guitar playing, is more intense and aggressive. It wakes listeners up after so many mellow, slower moving songs. I also didn’t mind “The Gift.” It’s pretty catchy, the music perks you up, and it’s pretty engaging even if Tom’s singing isn’t the best here.

Aside from these songs, the rest of the album is just okay. Songs like “Distraction,” “Do it For Me Now,” and “A Little’s Enough” don’t really have anything notable about them. I didn’t find them exciting, energetic, or upbeat. A lot of them were too slow for my taste and grew old really fast. A big part of is is AvA is more prog rock, a genre I’m not heavily into. While I didn’t think the songs were terrible, I could only stomach them for a little while. There’s just nothing drastically unique about these songs. Very little about the album is memorable aside from the one song I knew about before I listened to it.

The most I can say is a handful of songs have positive messages. Though it’s kind of cheesy “Good Day” is exactly what the title says, finding the good in everyday life while “Start the Machine” is about leaving a city in flames and discovering a utopia. There are also several songs looking at the bad battles can bring like “The War.” It’s fine that DeLonge wanted to expand his horizons and tackle different subjects, but they’re not the best written songs. Rather he sounds like a high school student who’s too optimistic about changing the world. Then again he never was the strongest songwriter. It’s clear DeLonge has larger than life ambitions as he shows with these songs and it’s great that he wanted to pen them. Even if you don’t like the songs, you can admire them for the issues they try to discuss.

So do I hate the album? Not really, but it’s not something I would listen to whole again. While there are a few interesting songs most of the album was just okay to me. Some of the songs were too slow for my taste while others were so easy to forget. It’s not a record that holds my attention for very long. After listening to it once I was bored with it and didn’t want to hear it again. But that’s just me. I’m just not an AvA fan. And it has nothing to do with DeLonge’s involvement with recent Blink drama. It just wasn’t my style.

California – Blink-182

Release Year: 2016

Rating: 7/10

The world of Blink-182 has been hectic ever since Tom DeLonge quit, but didn’t quit, but quit the band. So it was unexpected when the band announced a new album without DeLonge. And man, have feelings been tense throughout the fanbase. If you thought the band’s 2003 untitled album divided fans, you haven’t seen what this album has done to the community. Some find it awful, others think it’s great. Some just outright hated the record after hearing the lead single. It was hard to form my own opinion after reading so many negative comments about the new music. I even considered canceling my pre-order, but I stuck with my gut and gave it a shot. I knew I wouldn’t like it as much as their past stuff, but I was still excited. But this doesn’t mean the album is stellar. If anything it’s decent considering this is a new era for the band.

I was surprised by how much I liked the opening track “Cynical.” It begins slowly with Mark singing “There’s a cynical feeling/saying I should give up” and it speeds up to a rapid, frantic pace putting your energy into high gear. With the catchy hook, driving music, and Matt and Mark’s well-paired harmonies, it’s one of the strongest songs on the album. It’s pretty simple and standard for a Blink song, but it’s one that gets you excited for the record. The same can’t be said for “Bored To Death.” It’s not a bad song; it’s just underwhelming. It grows on you over time, but it’s pretty cut and dry. It also sounds like the band is trying a bit too hard to be meaningful with lyrics like “There’s a stranger staring at the ceiling/Rescuing a tiger from a tree.” The anthemic hook makes it prime for live shows, but it’s nowhere near their best.

The heavy, intense opening of “Los Angeles” caught me off guard. Something about the hard hitting music with a slight electronic twinge made it seem jarring for a Blink song. What won me over was the aggressive hook repeating “Los Angeles/When will you save me?” It has a lot of energy and power behind it to grab your attention. Just picture tons of people jumping up and down when that hook plays. The vocals are also pretty strong with Skiba fitting right in with the rest of the guys. It’s not the strongest song on the album, but it’s one of the most satisfying. After hearing him sing some more I thought he sounded a bit like Tom. I may be alone in that but it’s something I can’t shake.

From there most of the songs are generic and predictable. “She’s Out of Her Mind,” “No Future,” and “Rabbit Hole” all play out the same: standard pop-punk with bouncy music, high energy, and a fun vibe. These songs are pretty catchy though they abuse the “whoa-ohs” and “Na nas” too much. This type of filler has appeared on other Blink songs, but it’s never been abused to the point of being lazy. It feels like it pops up every other song. Though they’re not my favorite songs, I still found them enjoyable; just a bit typical. I can’t say the same for “Kings of the Weekend.” This song rubbed me the wrong way. It plays like the most generic party song where a bunch of kids try to be “rebellious.” With its upbeat energy and positive vibe, it sounds like it was made to be a high school anthem.

Blink were never the most prolific songwriters, but their slow tunes are usually good. That isn’t the case here. “Home is Such a Lonely Place” feels corny with its “please come home, I’m lonely” message. It’s also dull with the soft music and lackluster lyrics. Same goes for “Teenage Satellites,” which is so boring I can barely remember how it goes. “Sober” isn’t horrible; it grows on you during repeated listens, but it doesn’t grab you right away. It’s catchy, yet predictable. Something about the melody and the lyrics seem standard like you’ve heard them before. But it’ll stay with you for the simple hook of “I know I messed up/and it might be over/let me call you/when I’m sober.” The closing track “California” isn’t any better. Like so many of the songs here, it’s just okay. It’s kind of sappy since it’s a love song to their hometown, but again it doesn’t stay with you once the album ends.

The Only Thing that Matters” is a bright moment if only because it sounds like something from Dude Ranch. It’s another standard Blink song, but it wakes you up from the slew of “meh” with its chugging riff and abundant energy. Similar to the opening track, this one has a hyper vibe making it one of the fun tracks on the album. And the reference to Marilyn Manson is cute, yet unnecessary and it’s not the first time they do it. On “San Diego” there’s the line “We bought a one-way ticket/so we can go see The Cure.” I’m not going to lie – that line alone made the song stand out for me. Otherwise, it’s another okay track that’s tolerable at best. It’s grown on me over time, but it’s definitely not a highlight. They also mention Bauhaus on “She’s Out of Her Mind.” It seems odd since it’s not something they’ve done a lot in the past.

And then there are the joke songs “Built this Pool” and “Brohemian Rhapsody.” Both are about 16 seconds with one line about hooking up with dudes. They’re kind of funny and make you chuckle the first time you hear them. But they’re so short to even care about them. If they were at least a minute they would’ve felt worthwhile, like “Happy Holidays, You Bastard.” Instead, they’re throwaway jokes that aren’t even very funny. Not only that, they don’t fit in with the album. The sound of the record is classic Blink-182. The subject matter has changed slightly with a lot of reflection on growing up, but there’s talk of girls, getting girls, and losing girls like their earlier albums. Maybe that’s why they thought bringing back joke songs would be a good idea. Unfortunately, it just doesn’t work.

It sounds like I hate this album, but I actually don’t. My feelings are still a bit conflicted, but I actually enjoyed it. There are a handful of songs I loved that made me excited and pumped like past Blink songs. But most of them were just okay. They didn’t stand out and I couldn’t remember them even after hearing the album five times. A couple grew on me, but most weren’t notable. The album is definitely a throwback to their “classic pop-punk” sound and happy-go-lucky vibe. This has upset some fans feeling like it’s a step backward. While I understand this point, I’m not upset with the decision. Was it the right one? I have no idea. All I know is I don’t hate it.

Overall, it’s a decent album especially with such a huge change in the lineup. I wouldn’t call it better than their last release, but it’s a good start for this new era of Blink. What doomed this album from the start was its release after the DeLonge debacle. There are still so many people in the Tom = Good or Tom = Bad camp that it may affect opinions. Perhaps if they released the album under a different band name, it wouldn’t have been met so harshly. But when you take into consideration this is the first release from a band who experienced a very public disintegration, it’s pretty good. It’s not their strongest album, but it’s a band trying to find footing after such a shake up. As a Blink fan, I’m happy California is doing well and I hope they continue to do great thing whether with or without DeLonge.

“Bored to Death” – Blink-182

Released Year: 2016

Rating: 7.5/10

Things have been messy with Blink-182 ever since the drama with Tom DeLonge quitting, but not actually quitting, the band. Since then remaining members Mark Hoppus and Travis Barker moved on without DeLonge recruiting Alkaline Trio frontman Matt Skiba. It was initially for a few shows, but then there were talks of a new album. Considering everything that happened and DeLonge still insisting he’s not done with Blink-182, new music seemed like it was never going to happen. Blink changed that by releasing the single “Bored to Death” from their upcoming album California.

The song is standard Blink-182 pop-punk fare: low key verses, intense percussion, explosive chorus, and an overall anthemic feel. Hoppus takes over on vocals, while Skiba picks up backing vocals. With somewhat grim lyrics referencing growing up and “not coming home” it’s a pretty solid song. It’s nothing that’ll blow fans minds or get them excited for the new album right off the bat. I wasn’t even that impressed with the song when I first heard it, but listen to it a few more times and it’ll grow on you.

The chorus is simple, easy to remember, and is prone for sing-alongs. And the bridge with the “oh oh ohs” is infectious. It’s such a cheap way to make something stick, but damn it’s effective. It does feel overdone when the mindless singing comes in one more time near the end of the song. Skiba’s guitar playing is on par with the other guys. It doesn’t sound like he’s trying to copy what DeLonge did, but his style isn’t so drastic that it sticks out from the other members. Even his singing is pretty good and it makes me curious how he’ll sound on lead vocals. At times it does sound like a song suited for +44, but this could be because Hoppus is singing.

“Bored to Death” is nowhere near Blink-182’s best or most exciting material, but it’s promising. Overtime the song grows on you getting better and better, making you pumped for the rest of the album. Plus, Skiba seems like a good fit for the band. His style fits in with the other guys and never sounds like he’s a carbon copy of DeLonge. Of course no matter what you think of DeLonge, the group won’t be the same without him, but it’s great that this new chapter of Blink-182 is off to a great start.