Marilyn Manson

Top 10 Rock Stars You Forgot Were in Horror Movies

It’s Halloween! Time to overdose on candy and watch horror movies. Rock stars even get in the fun and sometimes make…interesting appearances in horror movies. Sometimes it’s not that bad, but most of the time it’s clear they should stick to music. To get you in the mood for things that go bump in the night, here are ten rock stars you forgot in horror movies. They’re ranked from best performances to worst.

10. Tom Waits in Bram Stoker’s Dracula

Somehow Tom Waits playing the role of the insane Renfield in Dracula is oddly appropriate. Watching scenes of him eating flies and gravelly cackling about his vampiric master is hypnotizing and frightening. He perfectly shows how far gone Renfield is at this point in the film. What is probably the creepiest thing is how he still seems charming even though he’s spiraling into madness and is out for blood. With his demeanor and trademark gravelly voice, seems like Waits should be in more sophisticated horror movies.

9. Chester Bennington in Saw 3D

Unless you’re an avid fan of the Saw franchise, you might’ve missed Linkin Park frontman Chester Bennington in the seventh installment of the series. In the film, he plays a Neo-Nazi named Evan who has to gruesomely tear himself from a car seat in order to save his friends. As you expect, things don’t end very well for the gang. Bennington puts his hard rock chops to work by screaming for his life. The scene is hard to watch and turns your stomach. Bennington landed the role by happenstance. Producer Mark Burg lived next to one of the Linkin Park bandmembers and heard Bennington was a huge fan. It’s an odd cameo, but at least he was decent at it.

8. David Bowie and Peter Murphy in The Hunger

If there’s anyone who could play a suave, sexy vampire, it’s David Bowie. The rocker landed the starring role in this 1983 “erotic thriller” about a love triangle between a doctor and a vampire couple. It’s not a horror movie per se, but rather a slick looking film with supernatural elements. Though the movie received mixed reviews, Bowie is as cool and stylish as ever. It may not be an awarding winning performance, but it’s better than most on this list. Bauhaus’ Peter Murphy also makes a brief appearance during the film’s credits singing the Goth anthem “Bela Lugosi’s Dead.”

7. Gene Simmons and Ozzy Osbourne in Trick or Treat

Two legendary rockers pop up in this forgotten 80s horror movie. In this film, Eddie is devastated over the loss of his favorite rocker Sammi Curr. He gets more than he asks when Curr starts haunting him. Simmons plays Nuke, Eddie’s friend who’s a DJ at the local radio station. The performance is forgettable and easy to miss as Simmons if you aren’t paying attention, or if you aren’t a KISS fan. But Ozzy’s turn as an evangelist talking about the evils of heavy metal must be scene. Dressed in a suit and with his hair slicked back, Osbourne warns kids about the evil of heavy metal with a straight face. Seeing as Ozzy’s music was touted as being Satanic and responsible for deaths in the 80s, it’s hilarious to hear him talk about the evilness of rock music.

6. Sting in The Bride

Did you know there was a remake/re-imagining of The Bride of Frankenstein? Yeah, it’s a terrible idea. To make things even more confusing, the film starred Sting as Baron Charles Frankenstein. The movie follows the same basic plot of the original: Frankenstein makes a mate for his infamous monster and everything goes to shit. Set in a lush Victorian setting, the film is visually pleasing, but that seems to be the most interesting about it. The movie was critically panned, as expected. Gene Siskel even called it a Monstorous Failure. But that didn’t stop Sting from starring in more movies, like Plenty and Dune. Guess the guy can’t take a hint.

5. Dee Snider in Strangeland

When Snider isn’t fronting Twisted Sister he’s apparently writing horror films. He wrote and starred in 1998’s Strangeland, which focuses on a small town being terrified by a tattooed and pierced baddie Captain Howdy. Howdy uses internet chat rooms to stalk and torture his victims. This is a movie that can only be made in the 90s when everyone was young and naive about the internet. The trailer looks cheesy as hell, but Snider at least seems decent. Still, the movie got negative reviews upon release. Guess people liked the movie the first time they saw it as Hellraiser.

4. Marilyn Manson in Rise: Blood Hunter

Marilyn Manson is no stranger to acting. He’s made appearances in films The Heart is Deceitful Above all Things and Party Monster. But in 2007 he made a low key appearance in sub par horror film Rise: Blood Hunter starring Lucy Liu. Judging from the three-minute clip, the movie is pretty lame. Manson is monotone and boring as the everyday bartender who helps Eve (Liu) to find someone. There’s nothing notable about his acting. The most interesting thing about the clip is Manson sans makeup, which is not as shocking as it used to be. There’s probably a reason you’ve never heard of this film. Maybe we need to keep it that way.

3. Jon Bon Jovi in Vampires: Los Muertos

Jon Bon Jovi has some weird obsession with being a cowboy. It started with “Dead or Alive” and lead to several roles in Western films. So when John Carpenter penned a script a horror Western, Jovi took the call to star as Derek Bliss, vampire hunter. This is actually a sequel to Carpenter’s 1998 film Vampires, which was pretty successful. This one, however, is a straight to video sequel. There’s really nothing else to say after that. You don’t need to see the entire movie to know it’s bad. Just watch the trailer and see how stiff and lifeless Jovi is in the starring role. Even the scene when he kind of turns into a vampire is dull. Maybe the rocker should stick with radio friendly hits that you love, yet hate at the same time.

2. Alice Cooper in Monster Dog

When browsing through Netflix one night, I came across this odd movie. A horror flick starring the equally frightening Alice Cooper? What could go wrong? Apparently, a lot. The movie is slow, dull, and just awful. Not even funny awful. Just bad. Cooper’s performance is unremarkable and the plot of wild dogs attacking random citizens sounds cool but is hardly terrifying. Even the scene where Cooper turns into a werewolf, which you have to sit through the entire movie for, is boring. To make things worse, the movie is dubbed in English and none of the English actors voiced their own lines. So throughout the entire viewing, you wonder if something’s off or if you’re just going crazy.

1.Roger Daltrey in Vampirella

In this terrible adaption of the long-running Vampirella comic series, The Who frontman Roger Daltrey stars in this direct to video film. That should say it all right there. Daltrey stars as Vlad/Jamie Blood, who is Vampirella’s enemy and a rock star on weekends. And yes, that does mean there is a musical scene in the film. Seeing an aging Daltrey straining and trying to be enticing with a rat’s tail on the side of his head is cringe worthy. He doesn’t sound bad performing, but when it comes to enticing vampires, Daltrey isn’t the first guy you think of. Judging from the trailer, it’s one of those movies you watch with friends to laugh at how awful it is. What was Daltrey thinking?

Honorable mention:

Sonny Bono in Troll

I didn’t include this one because Sonny Bono isn’t a rock star. But seeing him transform into some weird plant/pod monster was too good to not talk about. Bono gets trick by a troll in the titular movie Troll, yes the precursor to the hilariously awful Troll 2. If you can manage to sit throughout the entire thing, you’ll even catch a young Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Happy Halloween!

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Musical Quickie: Marilyn Manson and the Spooky Kids Live

Release Year: 2000

Rating: 6/10

I don’t actively seek out bootlegs, but I’ve been lucky enough to pick up a few during my travels. This Marilyn Manson one caught my eye in a record store because it featured the first live recordings from the Spooky Kids era. Unfortunately, it’s not very good. This bootleg from Nightingale Records takes an early performance from the band when they were known as Marilyn Manson and the Spooky Kids, along with some video from the same show. While it is cool to have live versions of these recordings since they haven’t been officially released, this album makes the show dull. The audio quality is decent at best making Manson’s banter sound muffled. The songs themselves are mainly early versions of tracks from the band’s first album Portrait of an American Family, like “Dope Hat,” “Cake and Sodomy,” and “Lunchbox.” It’s not made for listening to regularly, rather it shows how the songs are fleshed out with only slightly different lyrics. Otherwise, there’s nothing special about this bootleg. You can probably find better versions of these songs on another bootleg release. I can’t say much about the videos since they wouldn’t run on my computer. But they can be found on the unofficial DVD Birth of the Antichrist. You can even watch the show on Youtube. Unless you find this one cheap and want it for your collection, it’s best to avoid it.

15 Memorable Beavis and Butt-Head Video Moments

Beavis and Butt-Head were one of the things that made MTV great in the 90s. The duo’s moronic antics at scoring chicks, being cool, and messing with Daria made the show dumb in the best possible way. But what I always felt was the highlight of any Beavis and Butt-Head episode were the videos. They watched some of the most popular and obscure videos from the 80s and 90s and each was accompanied by their weird, hilarious, stupid commentary. They’ve watched so many videos it’s hard to keep track of them all, but here are my 15 memorable Beavis and Butt-Head videos.

15. “Heart Shaped Box” – Nirvana

The boys actually like Nirvana, so they don’t have too many bad things to say about this video. They cheer on their favorite parts while Beavis claims the video is giving him nightmares that look exactly like the video. The most memorable comment of the clip is their criticism of Kurt Cobain moving his hair from his eyes only to have fall back in his eyes. The video ends with Beavis promising to set up his room with stars and lights like the one from the video and Butt-Head retorting “You’re never gonna set up your room and you’re never gonna score.” It’s probably the smartest thing to come out of his mouth. Their commentary on “Smells Like Teen Spirit” is good too.

14. “I Wanna Rock” – DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince

The best moments on the show often come from the two misunderstanding what’s happening. And that’s all this clip is, a simple misunderstanding. This song asks only one question and Beavis thinks Will Smith just isn’t getting it. “He wants to rock right now. C’mon can’t you hear him?!” screams Beavis before freaking out at the song for slowing down. By the end of the song Butt-Head thinks Smith “still doesn’t get it,” but Beavis thinks he can use it to mess with teachers leaving him to think “not paying attention is cool.” Say what, now?

13. “The Caterpillar” – The Cure

When I found out Beavis and Butt-Head watched one of The Cure‘s videos, I couldn’t wait to see what they had to say about frontman Robert Smith. Luckily, they didn’t let me down. Unfortunately, the clip is no longer uploaded online, but the duo mainly wondered why Smith never looks at the camera. Honestly, I never noticed that until they pointed it out and every time I watch the video now I only focus on Smith not staring at the camera. They also mention how his lipstick is on crooked and how he should fix it. It’s a clip that’ll give Cure fans a good chuckle.

12. “Detachable Penis” – King Missile

This is one of the few clips where the duo don’t say anything. Instead they giggle incessantly at the word “penis.” They break from their bubbling laughter only to say “he said penis!” The longer you watch the two losing control, the funnier it is. Soon enough you’re mindlessly giggling with them. On another note, the song itself is really fucking weird. Seriously.

11. “The Family Ghost” – King Diamond

Even though the guys ripped on Grim Reaper plenty of times it’s surprising to learn they hate King Diamond more. Butt-Head even says “this might be the worst crap I’ve ever seen in my life.” They then go on to say Diamond looks like the Count from Sesame Street and how sad the whole situation is. Throughout the whole thing they remain shocked at just how bad it is. Considering how many metal fans love King Diamond it’s really funny to hear them point out just how ridiculous the band is.

10. “Blind” – Korn

“This looks like it might rock…maybe” is how this clip begins, but it’s not until Beavis makes himself dizzy that the genius of it comes in. Getting the high he was looking for he then sounds like a music critic citing everything wrong with the band, how they lack originality, and how they take ideas other bands making them bland. Not only is it funny, but it’s a spoof on all the hatred and criticism that got thrown at Nu-metal. Afterward Butt-Head slaps some sense into Beavis and tells him “you got all dizzy and started talking like a dumbass.” Nice dig there, Mike Judge.

9. “I’ll Stick Around” – Foo Fighters

There are so many hilarious moments from this clip from Butt-Head implying Beavis “swings that way now” to wondering if the band is dressed in white because they drive ice cream trucks. But the best part is when Butt-Head says “Hey it’s the dude from Nirvarna.” Beavis replies “Um I don’t think that dude’s with us anymore. You shouldn’t say that.” It’s a funny and clever way to sneak in a reference to Kurt Coabin’s death that wasn’t nasty or mean. I’m sure at the time it also made viewers take pause and reflect on the newly departed rockstar.

8. “I Alone” – Live

Did you ever wonder if the dude from Live was actually a pull string doll that screams and wets itself? That’s what the duo come up with while watching this video. Watching the clip now it looks pretty ridiculous, but Beavis and Butt-Head knew this while the clip was popular. Why is he making all those faces? Who’s that guy walking around on the set? What is up with that little braid? It’s these observations that show these guys may be dumb, but they at least say what everyone else is thinking.

7. “March of the Pigs” – Nine Inch Nails

Beavis and Butt-Head manage to rip apart this NIN video and make it seem silly instead of intense. Though they like the clip, they bring up several issues by demanding Trent Reznor put down his arms and start the song already. Comments on Reznor stumbling around like he’s drunk, touching other people’s stuff, needing to rehearse more, and wondering where they got those shiny pants makes you see the video differently. It doesn’t seem so intense and heavy in Beavis and Butt-Head’s hands. But the one thing I want to know is why is Reznor touching himself during the second verse? Maybe I don’t want to know after all.

6. “If I Only Had a Brain” – MC 900ft Jesus

This clip is pretty simple but works so well. Butt-Head drivels on about something while Beavis sings the bass line of the track throughout the entire clip. He stops for a second when Butt-Head slaps him across the face, but starts right back up again. No matter how many times he says “shut up, Beavis” he keeps going. Eventually Butt-Head can’t resist and starts doing it with Beavis. It may not be much, but it’s the mindless singing that makes this clip so funny.

5. “Long Hard Road Out of Hell” – Marilyn Manson

This isn’t the duo’s first time watching one of Manson’s videos, but they have the best commentary for this single. Aired during the Thanksgiving special, it starts out with Butt-Head complaining how people go all religious for Thanksgiving followed by Beavis stating “It is a Jewish holiday.” They then go on to confuse Manson for Cher saying she’s gone downhill thanks to “mentopause,” which makes her boobs get smaller and her butt swell up. They later figure out who it really is and wonder how he manages to hide his junk in one scene. It all ends with Butt-Head calling Beavis a lesbian since he apparently wants to have sex with “a dude.” Unfortunately, I can’t find the video online, so enjoy clips from their Thanksgiving special instead.

4. “Should I Stay or Should I Go?” – The Clash

For the majority of this clip Beavis and Butt-Head talk about Seinfeld. Why? Because they believe frontman Mick Jones is Jerry Seinfeld. This prompts them to discuss their favorite characters (the fat guy), that time when you can see Elaine’s boobs, and their favorite episode about “choking their chicken.” It’s hilarious because with his skinny frame, big eyes, and haircut, he kind of looks like the comedian. They finish the clip complaining about the volume of the video not being loud enough, yet they’re too lazy to turn up the TV.

3. “Sweating Bullets” – Megadeth

After watching this commentary from Beavis and Butt-Head, you’ll never hear Dave Mustaine the same way again. After trying to figure which guy was Mustaine, spoiler: it’s all of them, and discussing whether or not he was raised by wolves and why that would be awesome, Butt-Head makes an eye opening observation. “Hey Beavis, this guy talks like you.” Listen to Mustaine sing and Beavis chatter and you’ll see how right Butt-Head is. Hearing this revelation will ruin kick ass songs like “Peace Sells” for quite a long time.

2. “Step Down” – Sick of It All

Whenever I think of memorable Beavis and Butt-Head clips this is the first one that comes to mind. It starts out with Butt-Head actually being right about something: how shitty their lives are. He lists how they have no friends, are not in good health, they’re not happy, and they live in a crappy apartment. But it doesn’t matter since Butt-Head says “we’re cool” right after that. But the thing that makes this clip so great is when the two show off their own dance moves in a similar fashion to the music video. Their moves include “The Dillhole,” “The Bunghole,” and “The Fartknocker Double Inverted Nad Twist.” It’s a hilarious way to pay homage or mock, however you see it, the video they’re watching.

1. “Fear No Evil” – Grim Reaper

These two really hate Grim Reaper. They never have anything nice to say about their videos and they rip this one to shreds. They poke fun at the ridiculous costumes, the corny effects, and the singer, who they think is pretty ugly. When a guy in half a wolf costume pops up Butt-Head wonders if that’s how they draw Wolverine in England. Beavis keeps saying “That’s not Wolverine” until Butt-Head shouts “Shut up, Beavis!” Oddly enough, creator Mike Judge ran into the guitarist of Grim Reaper, who actually loved how mean the boys were and sent them the band’s other clips. Just shows how even musicians have to laugh at themselves once in a while.

What’s your favorite Beavis and Butt-Head video? Any moments that I missed? Let me know in the comments.

The Last Tour on Earth – Marilyn Manson

Release Year: 1999

Rating: 7.5/10

Ever since he became public enemy number one with parents and religious figures across America, Marilyn Manson‘s shows have always been a hot topic. From his special guests, costume changes, and wild antics, you never know what to expect next. Is he going to burn the American flag again? Or just tear out pages from the bible? Of course his shows now are way tamer than they were during the height of his fame, but this live LP was recorded at the band’s peak. With a solid setlist and the band on point, there’s one major thing that keeps this from being a flawless live LP: the band is too damn good.

Marilyn Manson is a very visual band and the frontman himself is all about theatrics. That’s what makes their live shows so much fun; there’s so much thought put into every aspect. Not surprisingly, this doesn’t translate well on the album. The band and Manson sound awesome; everything is always on point and never sounds dull. The problem is they sound so good, most of the songs are close to the recorded versions. This may not be an issue for everyone, but I personally like live versions to differ somewhat from the original recording. With the visuals in tact, songs like “Rock is Dead” and “Great Big White World” would be exciting and thrilling to hear. Without them they sound good, but it doesn’t have the same effect. There are moments where this works against the track, like on “Lunchbox.” Everything sounds great until the extended break where you know Manson is doing something and interacting with the crowd, but all we hear are distant cheers and occasionally Manson screaming “I wanna grow up!” Maybe this was left in to immerse listeners, but it doesn’t work.

There are a few songs that stand out as being superior live renditions. The first is the opening track “The Reflecting God,” which has awesome raw vocals from Manson. Otherwise it doesn’t differ drastically from the recorded version. Another is “Antichrist Superstar” because everything sounds more intense and in your face than the original. Here his vocals are loud and grueling, whereas before he was almost whispering the lyrics. But the best live track is “Last Day on Earth.” The song has always been dark and depressing, but this take features acoustic guitars and a stripped back sound, making it more desolate and haunting than before. It’s very bare bones, which makes it so damn chilling. When you think about it, it’s kind of a grim, somber way to end a live LP. There’s a good chance it was intentional, as with most Manson projects.

The setlist features mainly singles from the band’s first three albums, so expect to find popular songs like “Dope Show,” “Beautiful People,” and “Get Your Gunn.” There may not be any deep cuts here, but it is nice to get some live versions of songs from the first album, especially since Manson doesn’t perform them as much as he used to. “Irresponsible Hate Anthem” is another highlight from the band’s second LP. Manson sounds like he’s performing with fury and fire. He’s so fucking aggressive and in your face you think he’s going to punch you next. The entire track is chaos incarnate and ends with everything collapsing in on itself.

The album ends with the non-live track “Astonishing Paranormal End Times,” which was previously released on he Celebrity Deathmatch soundtrack. It’s one of Manson’s strongest and is actually what got me into the band. The track is energetic and brutal as hell. Manson’s vocals are sinister and viscous as he condemns those who are obsessed with violence and television by singing “Kill your god/kill your tv!” As he continues to sound threatening, the music gets chaotic and out of control. The best part is when he spits out “This is what you should fear/you are what you should fear,” which should be familiar to anyone who’s listened to “Kinderfeld.” It’s one of those songs you lose your fucking mind to and love every minute of it.

The album is a pretty good live compilation, but it has a lack of variety since many of the songs sound like their recorded versions. Either way, the setlist is solid, the band sounds amazing, and Manson’s voice is as sinister as ever. Though if you want to experience Manson live without paying ticket prices, it’s best to watch one of his concerts. No matter how hard it tried, this LP isn’t immersive and doesn’t capture the energy and excitement of the band live.

Playlist: This is the End of the World

Even though Donald Trump is running for president, we made it another year without the world imploding. It wasn’t that long ago when people didn’t think we’d make it to 2016. Whether it was nuclear war, Y2K, the Mayaen calendar, or Judgement Day, people felt the world was going to come to an end sometime soon. Still, it remains a topic of interest, especially for musicians. Several of artists envision what the end of the world will actually look like and it’s usually pretty scary. Here are a handful of songs about the apocalypse to remind you that not everyone thought we’d make it this far.

“Apocalypse Please” – Muse

Muse are no strangers when dealing with the end of the world. Many of their songs and videos reference it, but this track from Absolution does it best. The music comes marching in and sounds like it’s crashing down on you. Everything sounds like damnation before anything has started. As always, Matt Bellamy sounds sweet as he sings such fateful lines like “And this is the end/the end/this is the end/of the world.” As the music swells and Bellamy keeps pounding on the keys, the vibe gets steadily dramatic counting down to the moment where everything disappears. If there was a soundtrack for the apocalypse, this would be the first track.

“London Calling” – The Clash

Perhaps their most popular song, The Clash maps out the nuclear apocalypse on this single where they reference hiding in cupboards, the ice age, an enclosing sun, and “nuclear error.” The title itself is a reference to the BBC World Services identification during World World II. According to Joe Strummer the song came about from the events of Three Mile Island, which left him concerned about the state of the future. The track is also about the disintegration of the band. During this time they struggled with high debt, no management, and inner band disagreements. This is where the line about “phony Beatlemaina” comes in; they felt the punk rock bubble would burst at the end of the 70s. Unfortunately, they were right.

“Last Day on Earth” – Marilyn Manson

Like most of Manson’s songs, this one probably isn’t as cut and dry as we think, but it does have a lot of references to the apocalypse. In the track Manson finally finds his love, yet realizes it’s too late since the world is about to end. Featured on the excellent Mechanical Animals, the song is one of his most somber, depressing, and sentimental. Listening to the slow, echoing guitar riff and the swelling music gives you this sense of hopelessness. It also makes you think how would you spend the last day on earth with your lover. Though it is one of his best songs in his catalog, it does leave you shaken and isolated.

“The Final Countdown” – Europe

Whether you love it or hate it this song is one of the most ridiculous and overblown of the 80s. And it’s so much fucking fun to listen to. That iconic synth riff you sing out loud, shouting “it’s the final countdown!,” and the simple hook all make for an unforgettable song. Even though it has a party vibe, it’s actually about leaving behind an Earth that’s spent and finding life on another planet. Frontman Joey Tempest described the song as being both optimistic and apocalyptic. It’s exciting to be starting life on a new planet, but also sad to leave Earth behind, especially if loved ones were still there. This is one song that won’t ever die and has now found new life in a hilarious Gieco commercial. Thanks for that, Europe.

“Babylon’s Burning” – W.A.S.P.

Frontman Blackie Lawless was heavily inspired by the four horsemen of the apocalypse and the book of revelations for the band’s fourteenth album. This imagery pops up all over this song with references to clopping hooves, the number of the beast, and pale riders making the vision of the end clear in your head. Lawless said he was inspired to write the song and the album during the 2008 financial meltdown. He says this song is “an overview of what we allow ourselves to become and the consequences that befall us for the poor choices we make.” Also note that Lawless is a born-again Christian, which have a lot to do with this song’s themes. Why is it that most shock rock artists get religious as they get older? Alice Cooper, anyone?

“It’s The End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” – R.E.M.

This is probably the first song you thought of for this apocalyptic playlist. Sung in a rapid style where everything starts blending together, Michael Stipe claims everything is going pretty well even though he knows the world is ending. He offers a speedy rant on everything from Leonard Bernstein to overflow of the population. Inspiration for the song came from various sources, including Stipe’s dreams and what he saw while channel flipping. Despite it’s bleak title, the song is upbeat, energetic, and really catchy, which is why people love it so much. Even if you don’t like R.E.M. you at least know this song and probably even like trying to sing all the lyrics, even though it can be challenging.

“Fuck Armageddon…This is Hell” – Bad Religion

This punk band takes a different approach when it comes to the apocalypse. The lyrics reference the devout scorning others for being bad and hoping they can plead with God once the end finally comes. The band retort they don’t need to wait for Armageddon because the world they currently live in is hell alone. Violence, pollution, and hypocrisy are some of the reasons that make life so shitty according to Bad Religion. They end the song by proclaiming “Life is such a curse!” Bad Religion seem like they’ll be able to just shrug off the end of everything.

“Electric Funeral” – Black Sabbath

Apocalyptic themes can be found all over the band’s second album, but they come out strongest on this track. Ozzy sings about the destruction of homes, cities, and people all brought on by nuclear warefare. The images get pretty gruesome, especially during the bridge when the Prince of Darkness sings “Buildings crashing down to a cracking ground/Rivers turn to wood, ice melting to flood/Earth lies in death bed, clouds cry water dead/Tearing life away, here’s the burning pay.” If that wasn’t enough doom for you, the wavering wah-wah guitar riff itself sounds like it’s bringing on damnation. It may be bleak as hell, but it’s still one of Sabbath’s best songs.

“The Four Horsemen” – Metallica

If you couldn’t tell by now heavy metal and the apocalypse go together like spikes and leather. This track, originally written by former member Dave Mustaine, is all about the damnation, death, and misery that the four horsemen of apocalypse bring. Not only does it talk about the oncoming end of the world, it also deals a lot with the passage of time and how “you have been dying since the day you were born.” The origin of the song has an interesting history. Mustaine brought up the song to Hetfield under the original title “Mechanix.” Once he was fired, Metallica released the track under its current name. Mustaine also released the song under the original name and with different lyrics, but the music is very similar. Screw Guns N Roses. Anyone think Mustaine and Metallica should have a reunion?

“Countdown to Extinction” – Megadeth

Though this one doesn’t have strong apocalyptic themes, it still deals with the world coming to an end and it’s all our fault. The song was inspired by Mustaine’s concerns about the planet and environment. The title itself was ripped from a Time article speaking about the same issue. In the song, humans are referred to as an endangered species that is not only killing the planet, but also killing itself. The only thing left is to countdown how little time we have. What’s eerie about the song is it can still be applied today even more so than when it was written in 1992.

“2 Minutes to Midnight” – Iron Maiden

Is it a surprise Iron Maiden has a song dealing with impending doom? This popular Maiden track is more about the beginnings of nuclear war rather than Armageddon, but it’s still closely related. The title itself is a reference to the Doomsday Clock, created by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists to countdown global catastrophe. The lyrics actually talk about how war is often romanticized. Even though we find it repulsive and awful, a part of us are fascinated by it as well. Since its release in 1984, it has become a fan favorite and a staple at their live shows. Maybe it’s because Bruce Dickinson makes the most awful topics sound kick ass with his soaring vocals.

“Gimme Shelter” – The Rolling Stones

This Rolling Stones classic is pretty bleak and grim. Written during the time of the Vietnam War, the song is about the chaos, violence, and destruction war brings about. Though it does have overarching themes related to war, Jagger himself says it’s an end of the world situation and looking at the lyrics shows you why.  Trying find shelter away from the murders and rape is closely tied to trying to find protection during the end. During the time of these events many people did feel like the world was coming to an end, so it makes sense. This song is a haunting reminder of the violence and destruction that divided the nation not long ago.

“The Sky is Fallin'” – Queens of the Stone Age

While there are some interpretations of the song out there that suggest the song is about something deeper and personal to frontman Josh Homme, you can’t deny the references to doomsday in the lyrics. The opening verse alone sounds like it’s about the sun crashing into the Earth and realizing how much of your life has been wasted: “The sky is falling, human race that we run/It left me crawling, staring straight at the sun/Only a moment I notice, every dog has his day/I paid attention, cost me so much to today.” Also, the phrase “the sky is falling” usually has apocalyptic notions attached to it. It’s a hypnotizing track full of swirling guitars and Homme’s sweet cooing vocals. That man can make any disaster sound good.

There are a ton of apocalyptic songs I didn’t include, so which ones are your favorite? What did I miss? Let me know in the comments!