Knowing What You Know Now – Marmozets

Image result for marmozets knowing what you know now

Release Year: 2018

Rating: 8.5/10

When Marmozets burst on to the scene, they were hailed as one of the most exciting bands in rock. They hold on to this title with their album Knowing What You Know Now. The record is full of high energy tunes that are catchy, yet heavy and will get you moving whether you’re dancing or starting a mosh pit. All of their songs have this amazing energy to them that you’ll be singing them after hearing them one time.

Part of what makes the album so great is the energetic nature of the band and their intense attitude they pump into the songs. Opening track “Play” kicks things off with hard driving guitars and a pummeling rhythm that gets you moving before Becca Macintyre sings “I don’t dance ‘cause I want to/I dance cause I need to,” something anyone who needs to groove to let off some steam can get behind. It gets your adrenaline rushing and makes you excited for what’s to come.

The same boundless energy continues on tracks “Habits,” the hyper “Major System Error,” and the bouncy “Like a Battery.” These songs have such an intense drive and passion it makes them irresistible. These songs get you excited, make you start moving and shaking, and instantly grab your attention. They’re catchy as hell too. After hearing songs like the groove-laden “Lost in Translation” and “New Religion” once, they’ll get stuck in your head for the rest of the day.

Though they keep up with their fast, aggressive sound a notable change is Macintyre’s vocals. She’s always had a powerful voice, but here she plays around with her range. Before her power steamed from screaming and yelling. Here, she stretches her ability switching from deep, gruff vocals (“Suffocation”) and soft, slightly eerie crooning (“Start Again”). Not only is her voice impressive, it shows how she’s grown as a singer. She’s on her way to becoming one of rock’s best singers.

Marmozets slow things down with a few mellow numbers. “Insomnia” is well meaning but is the only low point on the album. While it lets you catch your breath from the heart palpitating songs, the singing is somewhat off putting. The song isn’t horrible; It has a good start with the dreamy, watery music, but when Macintyre hits those high notes during the hook they’re grating. It’s like she’s doing a weird Betty Boop imitation that’s both annoying and creepy. It’s enough to make you skip to the next track.

“Me & You” is another slow song, but this one actually works. The music is calm and gentle while Macintyre croons about saying goodbye to someone. It’s a bittersweet track about leaving someone, but hoping you’ll see them again someday. There’s this serene beauty to it that really makes the song stand out. It shows Marmozets have no problem slowing things down and showing another side of themselves.

The album closes with the sentimental “Run with the Rhythm.” It’s not the most engaging or memorable song on the record, but it’s the message that makes it stand out. It opens with the reassuring message of “Take your seats/Hear me speak/You’re not alone/In everything” letting you know you’re not alone in facing certain troubles. The hook “So run with the rhythm/run with your freedom” feels like it leaps and bounds throughout the song. It can be interpreted any way you want, but the main takeaway seems to be about freedom and doing things that make you happy. It’s a surprisingly uplifting way to end the album.

Knowing What You Know Now is a blast to listen to from start to finish. The songs are hyper, energetic, and thrilling. It’s hard to sit still while listening to the record. The band manages to keep their devil may care attitude and make songs that are so catchy you’ll be singing them all day long. And Macintyre’s unique, powerful voice helps make the album an unforgettable experience. Clearly, Marmozets are the best band you’re not listening to. At a time when rock feels stale and seems to be playing it safe, this UK-five piece is just what we need.

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